Looking for Ruckus 4x4 shocks upgrades

Messages
10
Likes
0
What aftermarket upgrade is there available for shocks looking to start upgrading things on my 1/10 rukus 4x4 monster truck
 

zderekv

Well-Known Member
Messages
70
Likes
28
I’ve found that the stock shocks work as well as any when properly tuned for your driving conditions. Set the correct static sag and change out the stock oil. You’ll need to set the sag first then drive it to determine whether you need to change your shock oil up or down. I run 30/35 (f/r) in my 4x2 Ruckus and it works for my mixed bag of driving - street, skate park, BMX track. I’d recommend doing this first and see how it tracks. Expensive aftermarket aluminum shocks sure do “look” good but even those will have to be tuned properly or that’s all they’re good for - looks, and your performance will suffer at your wallet’s expense.

Good luck, and remember THIS is what the hobby is all about - trial and error. Everyone thinks they have the right solution for your rig but only you drive it so only you know what it needs and when it’s just right.
 

kruzracing169

Well-Known Member
Messages
171
Likes
42
Location
ND, USA
STRC aluminum shocks. Traxxas lengths are very comparable to ECX. Get an caliper to measure center of hole to center of hole. I do not own a ruckus. I own a 2wd torment. Here is my setup, I built my own. Aluminum is the way to go, no flex or give. Stocks work for your average basher. If your looking for more, scrap the stock and go aluminum.
IMG_20181017_222757784.jpg
 
Messages
10
Likes
0
I’ve found that the stock shocks work as well as any when properly tuned for your driving conditions. Set the correct static sag and change out the stock oil. You’ll need to set the sag first then drive it to determine whether you need to change your shock oil up or down. I run 30/35 (f/r) in my 4x2 Ruckus and it works for my mixed bag of driving - street, skate park, BMX track. I’d recommend doing this first and see how it tracks. Expensive aftermarket aluminum shocks sure do “look” good but even those will have to be tuned properly or that’s all they’re good for - looks, and your performance will suffer at your wallet’s expense.

Good luck, and remember THIS is what the hobby is all about - trial and error. Everyone thinks they have the right solution for your rig but only you drive it so only you know what it needs and when it’s just right.
Thanks for the info
 
Messages
10
Likes
0
STRC aluminum shocks. Traxxas lengths are very comparable to ECX. Get an caliper to measure center of hole to center of hole. I do not own a ruckus. I own a 2wd torment. Here is my setup, I built my own. Aluminum is the way to go, no flex or give. Stocks work for your average basher. If your looking for more, scrap the stock and go aluminum.
View attachment 4495
Thanks for the info I will check in on them
 

zderekv

Well-Known Member
Messages
70
Likes
28
STRC aluminum shocks. Traxxas lengths are very comparable to ECX. Get an caliper to measure center of hole to center of hole. I do not own a ruckus. I own a 2wd torment. Here is my setup, I built my own. Aluminum is the way to go, no flex or give. Stocks work for your average basher. If your looking for more, scrap the stock and go aluminum.
View attachment 4495

I’ll respectlully disagree with the comment about going with aluminum bodied shocks because they don’t flex or give. At this scale (weight) I don’t believe the body of a plastic bodied shock is any more likely to flex than that of an aluminum bodied shock. IMHO, the benefit of aluminum, besides being threaded for adjustability, is that it’s less likely to blow a shock cap off after a hard landing. I think any flex will be in the shock shaft itself. But hey - I’m no expert or R&D guy. LOL!

I’m just giving my perspective, but however you choose to go you’ll still need to be able to tune it properly to see any benefit.

Again, no disrespect.
 

kruzracing169

Well-Known Member
Messages
171
Likes
42
Location
ND, USA
Plastic flexes, regardless the weight of the RC. Why do you think the shafts flex? It's coming from the piston sliding against the inside wall or chamber of the plastic material. So yes, upgrading to aluminum, there will not be any flex. Also, Traxxas has more true tolerance in their pistons to wall of shock housing. ECX does not...there will be more air to get in shock versus any other shock. You will need to rebuild shocks more often. You will blow off top cap on pretty much any plastic built shock.
What it comes down to is, how serious of a basher or racer are you?
 

kruzracing169

Well-Known Member
Messages
171
Likes
42
Location
ND, USA
Here is my shock setup that I feel that has really, really been successful. This route is way cheaper then going Proline or others per say.

Purchased the Traxxas 2wd Slash Ultra w/white springs, front and rear plastic shocks. Used the interior parts and swapped over to aluminum housings.
STRC brand;
#ST3767R (red)
#ST3765XGM (gunmetal)
#ST3766XGM (gunmetal)
Used 2 hole pistons with 30 weight oil.

Team Losi Racing brand springs;
TLR5182, 3.5 rate spring on front
TLR5171, 3.4 rate spring on rear

This shock setup gives you an lower ride height/lower roll center, which gives awesome handling. Adjustment of washers to springs, gap on front and just touching on rear. I used a calliper to get exact distance to match to other side.
(Side note, you can take your stock shocks and install Nitro fuel line (or clear vacumm line from parts store) cut to 3/16" lengths and install inside your shocks to give a lower ride height).
 

zderekv

Well-Known Member
Messages
70
Likes
28
I’ve been doing this for 30 years and I still stand by my original comment that expensive aftermarket aluminum shocks sure do “look” good but even those will have to be tuned properly or that’s all they’re good for - looks, and your performance will suffer at your wallet’s expense.

An even better piece of advice would be save the money you’d be spending on upgrading an entry level vehicle and put it towards a true race vehicle. Stock stuff is absolutely fine for bashing, trust me.

FYI - if anyone disagrees and wants to see how a stock suspension can hold up to a bash session you can watch this video of me (red Northeast RC truck) driving at the park with a few friends. The only mods to that suspension was 50wt oil in the rear and 35wt up front. Please excuse the camera man’s language at 4:15-4:30.



And here’s one of our better produced vids with a bit more of how we treat our stuff.

 
Last edited:

kruzracing169

Well-Known Member
Messages
171
Likes
42
Location
ND, USA
That's great. Sweet "jump". How does your stock shock hold up, hitting rythum, triples, doubles, etc on an outdoor track for a solid 7 minutes, when a lap takes 40 secs? Oil gets warm, plastic gets more plyable, shocks fail. Overworked and under paid.
Ok, your stock shocks hold up. I have raced wheelers for 13 years and RC my whole life. Stock suspension is as good as it can be, yes, fine tune it, do whatever. Aluminum will always be better, you still will need to fine tune them too. You can't just bolt anything on and expect greatness.
IMG_20180905_202436824.jpg
IMG_20180902_101913337_HDR.jpg
Snapchat-381860836.jpg

Here's some photos. Some carnage. Yes, these are entry level hobby grade RCs that take a beating and keep moving. They can be setup to be competitive. They are an awesome chassis to learn and build and grow from. They will not be on top podiums but they will be the ones that stay strong.

My suggestion is. Do what you can afford.

-Stock with new oil 35wt and different springs.
-aftermarket, proline, HR, GPMs, etc.
-Traxxas Ultras for slash.
-Or custom.

It's a hobbyists preference, and my setup has been proven on and off the track. I ran stock ECX tuned, stock Traxxas Ultras tuned, customized stock Traxxas Ultras tuned, and customized customized Traxxas Ultras STRC shocks.

I have not ran aftermarket other companies, I like customizing. I will spend extra to learn and grow. Soooooo, that is my 2 cents.

Get out and have fun RCin'
 

zderekv

Well-Known Member
Messages
70
Likes
28
Did the OP mention racing? If he did I missed it. Personally, I’m not a racer, just a basher. But if I did race I’d simply tune for those conditions because that’s what the hobby is to me. I’d also start off with a vehicle designed for its intended purpose. Cheaper and better in the long run.

Otherwise I think we’re trying to get the same basic message across as your comment about still having to fine tune whatever shocks you run is what I’ve said from the start. Properly tuned stock shocks will outperform poorly tuned “upgrade” shocks 10 times out of 10. I’m just saying don’t waste money on upgrades until you’ve tried to tune whatever it is you don’t like out of the OE parts. Problem is, new hobbyist don’t know what it is they don’t like or why they want to upgrade other than the misconception that shiny parts will automatically go faster.
 
Top